Brief Talk Episode 10, our interview with Farak Mak - Part 1

December 16, 2021

Brief Talk Episode 10, our interview with Farak Mak - Part 1

Brief Talk Episode 10, our interview with Farak Mak - Part 1

I'm so incredibly excited to actually share with you episode 10 of Brief Talk from Everyday Lingerie Co. When filming this episode, I was sitting down with this incredible woman. If you haven't heard of her, her name is Farah Mak, and she's started The Self-Worth Movement. It's such an incredible movement and everything she stands for just resonates with me so much that I've really wanted the opportunity to sit down and share our conversation with you all.

So when we wrapped up the episode of filming, we realized that we've gone over an hour. We just couldn't stop chatting and there's so much amazing content in there. Just the conversation flows so effortlessly and there were so many topics covered that I really want to share the whole lot with you. So we're actually going to be breaking it into two episodes. So without further ado, please, here is episode one, I hope you enjoy it with the amazing or part one, I should say, of Brief Talk episode 10, my conversation with Farah Mak.

 

Danielle Sady:





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to episode 10 of Brief Talk. I'm really excited to have someone incredible to introduce you to today, but I want to start by actually reading you a piece of poetry called She Shines.

Her beauty in abundance with a radiant glow from deep in her soul to the outside it shows. Soft flowing hair and porcelain skin, the depth of her beauty comes from within. Her spirit it shines as she walks in the room, her breathtaking beauty like a sweet perfume. Her heart full of love from heaven above, but she's been broken down inside sorrow, her heart frowns.

She knows not of her beauty that everyone sees when she looks in the mirror, she doesn't believe how worthy she is of the beautiful love she deserves to receive but feels unworthy of. They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If only she saw now not wait until she's older for her beauty is true, everlasting, and fine, just one look through God's eyes and she'll see how she shines.

This incredible and touching piece has been written by a woman who is not only an inspiration to me, a woman who is an actor, entrepreneur, writer, speaker mama for, and also the amazing founder of The Self-Worth Movement. Miss Farah Mak.

 

Farah Mak:

Thank you.

Danielle Sady:

 

Thank you so much for joining me here today for this episode of Brief Talk. Truly honored to have you here and thank you for allowing me to read that piece of poetry.

Farah Mak:

 

Oh, it's my absolute pleasure. And hearing you read it, you just spoke it beautifully with the way it was supposed to be read and I got a little bit teary in that moment.

Danielle Sady:

 

Sorry, but just it needs, as I said to you before we started filming, I hoped I read it with justice because it's a powerful piece that speaks to me and hopefully to our audience on so many levels. Wow.

Farah Mak:

Oh, thank you. Absolutely beautiful. You are absolutely beautiful and I'm so happy to be here at last.

Danielle Sady:


Thank you. Yeah, I know, finally. So for any of you who don't know, Farah and I actually have been chatting for almost two years I think now.

Farah Mak:

I think so, yeah.

Danielle Sady:









Never physically meeting in person until today which is super exciting to have her at the Everyday Lingerie Co studio. And we want to chat about everything. We want to talk about being an actor, a mom, a business owner, an entrepreneur, the glitter bomb that you are, and the way you spread joy through everything you do, that sparkle of magic. I love this saying, always believe something magical is about to happen, and I feel it's in everything you say and do so would a fair assumption to say that it's sprinkled with a little bit magic everywhere?

Farah Mak:



Absolutely, magic and sparkles everywhere. I think I've always had that. Ever since I was a child. I live in that kind of sparkle glitter world with rainbows and unicorns prancing through my mind.

Danielle Sady:




I love it. I was saying to someone the other day like, "I'm done. I just want to focus on my unicorns and rainbows," and while to others that might seem child-like or unrealistic, I'm happy to live that way because it allows me to be the best version of myself.

Farah Mak:

Absolutely.

Danielle Sady:

And that's what I need to be true to. Have you kind of found that in your journey when you look at it that way?

Farah Mak:





Yeah. When you set yourself free and allow your inner child to play, then the creativity flows and everything else flows. You can still stand strong in knowing who you are and be the lioness like we spoke about before, but I think if you can allow yourself to be carefree and playful and creative, then it just flows through it and creates joy.

Danielle Sady:







It does. I think recently I thought about it and it's almost I felt like I lost some of that as I've grown up. As we all do sometimes, we start almost becoming too adult-like and we forget that freedom we have with our creativity, with our mind and the joy feel as a child. And if I go back to my eight-year-old self-pretending I was a business owner and I was doing all of these things, the unwavering self-belief that came from that and the worthiness that I never doubted I was worth it.

Farah Mak:

Yes.

Danielle Sady:


And I go, "I've got to bring back that child a little bit more in me and allow that to filter through." Would you say that that rings truth to you too?

Farah Mak:








 

Yeah. I agree. And I think as we grow up and grow older and different people come in and out of our lives, you can be or that's where your self-worth journey is affected. So you take on things of other people's expectations of yourself rather than letting yourself just shine, you think, "Oh, I need to do this to please that person," or whatever. So you dial yourself down or other people's expectations dial you down and it closes the door to that inner child.

So when you free yourself from that and just unravel all of this stuff, then you can just be your true self and you'll attract the right people into your life as well then.

Farah Mak:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Absolutely.

Danielle Sady:







So I want to get in. I did write a few questions to help us work through, because as we both discuss, we really wanted this to be a really open dialogue that was kind of let it flow as we already have, but there is some questions I need to ask you and I really want to share with the audience. So let's start with the whole acting speaker, how you got into the world, putting yourself into that public domain. Where did that journey start for you?

Farah Mak:

That actually started very young, like a little girl. I think I was performing from about three years old so.

Danielle Sady:

Wow.

Farah Mak:





My mum was really shy though so she'd take me out to the shops or whatever, and I'd be out introducing myself and talking to people and everything. And then at about nine years old, I started formal acting training and started doing some of my first professional work. I worked on a film clip with Olivia Newton-John

Danielle Sady:

Oh wow.

Farah Mak:

Yeah. I've still got the photos of it, you could see little Farah.

Danielle Sady:

That's incredible.

Farah Mak:





















 








And so did bits and pieces right up until I was about 15, and then my parents went through an awful divorce and I remember at the time I had an acting agent. I colored my hair a bit, I had braces on and she was like, "Oh, look at you. You're never going to get work." So all the self-worth stuff, so I was going through personal stuff and then my acting agent. So I just stopped it all. I was like, "I'm not good enough. I'm not worthy. I can't be doing this." And my path went a little bit different.

But coming back, so then I fast forward about 15 years later, I took a redundancy from the corporate job I was working in, and I was like, "I've always wanted to study at NIDA. I've always wanted to be an actor. I'm going to take this opportunity and give it a go." And so it wasn't until in my 30s that I got accepted into NIDA and studied acting there and changed my path. And at the beginning of that, I secured a new agent who was beautiful and it was about seven weeks after my son Levi was born.

She contacted me and said, "Ah, I've got a job opportunity for you. It's an audition for a presenting job." And I was like, "Oh, I can't do that. I'm an actor and it's a very different skill set." And I thought, "No, I can just be an actor playing the role of a presenter." So that's what I went and did and got my first presenting job on TVSN which is a shopping network.

So I did that for about seven years and I've been acting in between. So coming back to your question, that was a long answer. It was a childhood dream, passion. Did it as a child then lost my sense of worth and felt not good enough. So dropped that for a while, well, not dropped, just didn't feel like I was good enough, and then came back to it when I was back on self-worth journey.

Danielle Sady:








Isn't it incredible so many models, actresses, singers, songwriters artists of any kind, especially when you go to agents or whoever it is that's helping you propel or take you down that path that so many people stop at that part because of that situation like I know models to your nose is too big, your size is too big, you're too tall, you're too short, you're too whatever. And at such a young impressionable age, do you think if you went back now, you know better that their opinion doesn't equal your worth?

Farah Mak:




Absolutely. Now as who I am now and going on that journey, I know that my worth is intrinsic and I know who I am, what I stand for and what I want to say. So I can absolutely say now I go to auditions and don't get them and I just go, "Oh that was..."

Danielle Sady:

That wasn't meant for me.

Farah Mak:

Next. Yeah.

Danielle Sady:

Yeah, yeah.

Farah Mak:

But being that 15-year-old impressionable vulnerable didn't know who she was, it's a completely different story.

Danielle Sady:





And that's one of the things and we will get to it more, but with The Self-Worth Movement for me, becoming a stepmom, a mom, knowing my journey and then what I'm passing on, I feel like it's my obligation as a woman, as a mother to not only find that worth in myself every day and acknowledge that and let that shine, but also set that example.

Farah Mak:

Yes.

Danielle Sady:

I feel that it's probably one of the biggest things that I feel as a woman that I have to do for my kids, especially my stepdaughters.

Farah Mak:

100%, because you're role modeling that then.

Danielle Sady:

Correct.

Farah Mak:

So that's what they're seeing is normal and that's what they're seeing is that's what they want to become.

Danielle Sady:









Correct. And I think when you started talking to me about your journey with it, it was really thought-provoking for me. I had been through postnatal and was thankfully after getting the help I needed coming out the other side, but there was stuff I needed to keep pursuing in everyday life to ensure that I remembered who I was, what made me a human being. And it wasn't a label of a wife, a mother or anything, I was a worthy woman. I'm a worthy human being. I'm a worthy person to be here and live my journey. So whatever that means for someone, I have to find my own worth in that.

Farah Mak:



Yes. Absolutely. That is beautiful and powerful. And when you know your worth, then anything that flies at you, anything that comes at you or tries to attack you even, adversity, challenges, bullying.

Danielle Sady:

Doubt.

Farah Mak:






Doubt, self-doubt, fears, then you've got that magical shield, because your worth can protect you from that. So that's why it's important to me, exactly what you're doing to teach our children that from a young age. So then they've got that shield of protection knowing their worth. So it doesn't matter what stuff is thrown at them, they believe in themselves, they know their worth, they know their inner powers.

Danielle Sady:











Yeah. And I don't think it matters. We set this example, they're still going to go on their journey. I'm not saying that my kids are going to be exempt from any of it, because they're not. However, if I give them tools from my behaviors and my actions, I think that's where we can equip them because we still can't run their journey.

I've got this beautiful analogy put across my desk the other day and it was our children are like caterpillars turning into butterflies and we've got two options, we can either cut the cocoon open or we can allow them to break out of the cocoon by using their wings. Because when a butterfly is strong enough, they will break through themselves.

Farah Mak:

That's beautiful.

Danielle Sady:







I just thought that spoke volumes to me because so many times you want to cut the cocoon for them and it's even in this journey. So we give them the tools, we show them by example, we'd be the best version of ourself, whatever that can be. And again, not everyone's going to agree with the best version and that's okay. But finding it in yourself, I think we spoke of that little bit of glitter around the world for other people to see it.

Farah Mak:
















Yes. Absolutely. And I agree with you on the allowing them to break out of the cocoon in their own because I know for myself, I'm basically shoving self-worth down my children's throats. We're doing affirmations and through the prayer, I talk about all of that every day. However, my 10 year old daughter is teen going on 21 and she's doing TikTok and there's social media and then there's the schoolyard stuff and they were out and about.

So she's already faced with stuff where she's wondering who she is and what goes on despite having her mom being the self-worth glitter bomb. So I'm like, as long as I, exactly what you said, give her the tools to embed that into her. So she will still face her challenges, all of my children will but I'm talking particularly little girls seem to be more affected by self-worth and, and doubts and things like that. Give her the tools so it's of her DNA almost, so then she can learn and grow along the way, but she's always got that within her.

Danielle Sady:


Yeah. The tools are so important because give the man the fish or teach him to fish kind of analogy to say completely different but...

Farah Mak:

I know what you're saying.

Danielle Sady:








Yeah. So that leads me into let's talk about the self-worth movement because that's really... I know it's one of your proudest next to being a mom, of course. I know the self-worth movement is something you are so proud of. And it's not about anything other than having a platform to actually share this message and celebrate others in finding their worth. So I really want to chat about how it started and what you've found on the journey and the second part would be what it raised for you in that journey.

Farah Mak:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Great question.

Danielle Sady:

Sorry threw that out there just...

Farah Mak:

Yeah. You're going to make me cry, girl.

Danielle Sady:

I didn't mean to. You'll probably make me cry if you start crying so there's ugly crying on this, I'm sorry.

Farah Mak:





































 







I love that you started with She Shines because that is how The Self-Worth Movement was born. It all started life as a poem and I wrote She Shines many years ago when I was coming out of an abusive relationship. So I had been through a really difficult time in my life and I had no idea who I was. I describe it like I was an empty shell floating in the lonely sea aimlessly. I just was this... I felt soulless at the time.

And then I remember sitting on a train and I saw this beautiful young girl who reminded me of me. So she was absolutely lovely, beautiful, but I could see through her that there was self-doubt and insecurity within and then she shines is the words literally just came to me and I wrote that kind of to her, to myself, a love letter, a call to arms. So I wrote the poem, which was really cathartic and healing for me at the time, and then I always had a vision to turn it into a short film as an actor and storyteller. I wanted to create a resource to be able to give to women's shelters and schools and create something whimsical and magical and beautiful but with the strong story and heartache in it to show that there is light at the end of the tunnel.

And I adapted the poem into a film, and this is over a period of many years. And then we got Theo McLeod who cast Neighbors as our casting director and producer and Susie Montague who produced Ride Like A Girl on board. And then the girls got Eddie McGuire on board who's now our executive producer and we were in development discussions about it and then the pandemic hit. So suddenly we were like... Well, I was like, "Okay, well, I can't move forward with this. What do I do?"

I was actually working with the life coach at the time and she said, "Farah, what are you doing next? You're like the brand of Self-Worth, what are you doing next? Because you can't make your film, what's happening?" And I was like, "Okay." So she was a blessing because she just kept me moving forward, and The Self-Worth Movement was born and I just used a lot of the tools and healing and therapy and everything that I had done and then put more research in to create the Worthy Woman Cards as the first product, then obviously our social media and my blogging and everything.

So yes, it started life as a poem, became almost a film, then became a social enterprise and the film is now back in development and it's now looking at being a full length feature film, stay tuned.

 

Danielle Sady:



Wow. That is incredible. And I think what I love about this is it's your journey. However, when something is so raw and real, the interpretation is open for others to see the message in it for them.

Farah Mak:

Yes.

Danielle Sady:














And we are drawn to people, places, things for that reason. And we all can get something so different out of it. And for me, like I said, I met you at a time where I was coming out the other side of postnatal depression. And whilst that doesn't define me, it took away a lot of my worth. I doubted myself, I had these insecurities that were there. So having a card that tells me I'm worthy reminded me of the different elements of myself. And I know when I watch the film that I'm going to be sitting there going, "Wow," I'm going to pick up something different again to reading this.

And I read She Shines to my husband, actually, when I said to him before I sent you some notes and asking if I could have permission to read it and he welled up and he said, "I don't know Farah," he said, "but I feel like I can hear her."

Farah Mak:

Oh wow. That's beautiful.

Danielle Sady:



















And I just went, "Wow. He is a sensitive guy but to see that through." We've both been divorced, he's had children in divorce, I've come from divorced parents so when you can look at it through someone else's eyes and identify things, he picked up the phone, sorry, I didn't mean to throw this on you. I'm getting emotion now, he picked up the phone and talked to his daughters and had a conversation with his kids that night and it was just something different. The way he spoke to them that night was just different.

And I think that changes people in such a beautiful way. And I can't celebrate you enough, like I said, you're an inspiration to me and to stand up and share your hurt that has now turned into this beautiful thing for you and allowing you to shine so brightly. You didn't let it dim your light. It took it down a notch for a little bit, but you've come up even brighter and I think that's what it is that's so beautiful. And then now heading down the path of where that takes you as a mom, the more you live and breathe this every day, how do you think it's changed you as a mother?

Farah Mak:







Oh, I think it comes back to what you were talking about before is it's that role modeling, it's being your best self and that's why I'm very big on preaching about self-care, taking the time for all that and I educate my kids about that. Mommy needs mommy time because it makes me a better mommy for you. So it is just being my best self and being free and playful. Some of my kids are now like, "Mum, you're cringy," but I know they love it.

Danielle Sady:

Yeah. You're embarrassing me.

Farah Mak:





But I want them to know that you can just dance and whatever, be your true best self. Yeah, exactly. And don't worry about what other people think. Just be in your own space and be kind, have strong values. So it's trying to embrace all the values in the worthy woman card and I'm by far not perfect. I will drop the F bomb, I get it angry, I get sad.

Danielle Sady:

Yeah. We all do, it's real life.

Farah Mak:

But it's day to day just trying to be my best self.

Danielle Sady:









And that's the thing for anyone who follows you. If you don't follow Farah already, go to @thefarahmak on Instagram because you will see someone who really doesn't care in the sense of you care about others, you care about yourself, but you are putting yourself out there. I mean you and Mr. Mak, I love Mr. Mak. They're so cute together. And just putting it out there and having fun and the kids are with you sometimes and they're not, if they don't want to do it. When you do it, it's authentically you. And I hate the word authentic because I feel it's overused, but I don't know how else to say it.

Farah Mak:

Yes. I know what you mean.

Danielle Sady:









It's in that setting. And like you said, there's some days when you feel like shit, there's some days when we ugly cry, there's some days when all of these things happen, you're human, we all are human. We're allowed to have those moments, but it's I think how we dust ourselves off and get back up and keep moving forward is the important thing. So if it is, if you need some help, you've got self-worth movement cards, follow Farah, follow someone who empowers you to really feel like the best version of yourself. If something's not serving you cut it out.

Farah Mak:

Absolutely. Find the door.

Danielle Sady:



I'm a big one for unfollow or unfriend or stop doing something. When I'm starting to recognize that it's not benefiting me or making me feel worthy, I have started learning that I have to say no and stop certain behaviors

Farah Mak:




100% and then you're doing the right thing by both parties. So it's okay to say no and it's okay to let people go. I love the saying people come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime, so then you can let go with compassion and kindness and love and move forward.

Danielle Sady:

Yeah. A relationship doesn't always have to end badly.

Farah Mak:


No, absolutely. I love what you said about for how I don't care, but I care and that's really a beautifully way to say it. Beautifully way.

Danielle Sady:

Beautiful way to say it. Yeah. Don't quite as in that English today.

Farah Mak:






I also can't speak English very well today. Because that's a stage I've got to in finding my worth, I used to always care what people think. I used to be the perfectionist and a people pleaser and all of those things that come in when you have a low sense of self-worth. And as I've built my worth up and done my own healing journey, I really don't care. But I do care, like you said, I care about myself, my family, all my community on social media.

Danielle Sady:

It's respectful.

Farah Mak:







I care wholeheartedly, but I don't care about negative stuff. I put a little real up the other day about my husband's new fancy car and someone who I don't personally know wrote, "Are you serious?" And I was like, "I don't know how to take that because I don't know you so I just wrote back literally I wrote, "Oh, thanks for asking. I'm normally quite happy go lucky but I have been known to be serious at times," I'm not quite sure what you mean by that so there you go.

Danielle Sady:



And that's the whole thing. In this day, I don't think social media has changed anything that wasn't there before. So many people, it's just an easier way to communicate and hide behind something rather than saying it to their face.

Farah Mak:

Yes.

Danielle Sady:












That's the only difference. It's no different to what would happen if you walked into that agent's office or the principal or this other student at school, it hasn't changed, it's just given more platforms or more avenues. So I think you've handled that beautifully. I love that. So we've got a no trolling policy.

So any negative comment derogatory towards, you can say anything you want, if it's about the product and you want to ask something or you think we're too expensive or whatever, I'll answer it, I'll take you through reasons why we sit at a price point. But if you're coming after anyone on the page, you're out.

Farah Mak:

Yeah, good.

Danielle Sady:

I don't even engage.

Farah Mak:

So nice clear boundaries.

Danielle Sady:





It's very clear for me because it's unacceptable to go down that path. But I think I love that response that it was like, "Well, I have been known to be serious." Not very often if you know Farah. Unless she's in a business meeting, it's all about enjoying it and getting the most out of every experience. I think that's probably how I would best describe you.

Farah Mak:

Definitely, yes. Yeah.

Danielle Sady:





I love it. So there's a glitter tab on your website. Anyone who's visited theself-worthmovement.com.au, there's a seven day challenge. I want to talk about that. Where did that come from? Because there's so many challenges we can do, but I love this because it comes from the need within, that fuel.

Farah Mak:













So that was created when we first launched The Self-Worth Movement. So whilst we have the products and I have a new program, which I can talk to you about afterwards, so there are business sides of the social enterprise, my main goal is to educate, inspire, and empower women and girls about self-worth. And I was like, "How can I do that for people who might not be ready to buy the cards and things like that?"

So we've got the social media platform I blog and then we created the glitter tab. So we've got a self-care challenge and a self-worth challenge which is slightly different, and it was created from, again, all the things that I've done. And we did it seven days to make it nice and easy and bite size because we're all busy working moms or just life busy.

Danielle Sady:

It's really hard to get to that, yeah.

Farah Mak:














 

And so each exercise is quite simple with each activity I should say, and it might be stuff that you might do every day in your life, but to do it in a seven day challenge creates an actual pattern of self-care even for me. So I did it when we first launched it, I did it live every day on Instagram. So I wasn't able to really enjoy it because you're there, but I shared the experience with my community for a purpose and it made me go, "Oh."

When I was going out for a walk and I can't remember one of them, but I actually went to the ocean and I found a starfish and I looked down and I ran my fingers through the water and so I really took on nature or it might be reading a book or the different things that we have on there when you put it all in this seven day challenge, it actually embeds self-care for you and makes you literally stop and smell the roses, I literally did that.

Danielle Sady:



I love that. But it is, it's so important. It was something I read the other day and it asked me, when I'm walking down the stairs, am I on my phone? Am I listening to something? Am I talking to someone or am I focusing on each step I take?

Farah Mak:

Yes.

Danielle Sady:


And I went, "I don't know the last time I would've walked down the stairs from the office to the showroom or at home and actually paid attention to the stairs."

Farah Mak:









How often do we make time to be present? Because we're scrolling while the kids are talking while we're cooking or whatever, so if you can actually literally stop and smell the roses or stop and go, "Oh, this carpet feels nice under my feet," or taking that moment to actually be present, and it's so hard to do if you don't actually make time for it. So that's why the Self-Care Challenge was created. I've gone in and done it again myself since then to actually give myself that gift rather than sharing. It's nice to share as well, but sometimes you need to just do it for yourself. Right?

Danielle Sady:







So you set your goals or your standards that you want for the year, something that it's almost like your values and your mission statement for the year ahead versus just one off thing. So if you are thinking about it, maybe the seven-day challenge is something to start on the 1st of January, even and get you through those first seven days and really set yourself up for success moving forward with that self-love and filling up that cup for yourself.

Farah Mak:





That's a great idea. And the good thing about the seven-day Self-Care Challenge is that every time you do it, you get a new experience or a new awakening and it will enlighten creativity and like you said, get you calm, centered grounded. So every little thing in there has a purpose and intention to what it will bring out in you.

 

So that wraps up Part 1 of Episode 10 and my chat with Farah Mak. As mentioned early on we had to

break this into 2 parts as we had lots to chat about, so please watch part 2 that will be live on Friday 17th

December and to find out more about Farah Mak (@thefarahmak) and The Self Worth Movement

(@theselfworthmovement) .

Have a wonderful week

Danielle xxx

 

 




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Sizing

Trying to find the right underwear size can be difficult due to different companies making different sizes. To make things easier we have created a step by step guide to take the guess work out of the equation.

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Finding your size in our Underwear Range:

All you need to do is take a couple of simple measurements; your waist, your lower waist and your hips. The best way to do this is by using a soft measuring tape and a mirror to ensure you are accurate.  If possible stand in front of a mirror when taking your measurements to ensure that the measuring tape is also parallel to the floor and is flat.

Measurement 1: Your waist

Your waist is the natural in indentation above your hips or just below your rib cage (see image). Wrap the soft measuring tape around firmly without pitching your skin together – write this measurement down.

Measurement 2: Your Lower Waist

Your lower waist is approx. 12cm down from your waist.  Take your measuring tape and run this down from your waist to 12cm (see image). Wrap the soft measuring tape around this area firmly without pitching your skin together – write this measurement down.  

Measurement 3: Your hips

Now wrap the soft measuring tape around the fullest part of your hips, this is approximately 25cm below your waist (see image). Use the mirror to check that your measuring tape is completely straight and parallel to the floor – write this measurement down.

 

 

Finding your size in our Crop Top Bralette Range:

All you need to do is take a couple of simple measurements; your Full Bust and your Lower or under bust. The best way to do this is by using a soft measuring tape and a mirror to ensure you are accurate.

Measurement 1: Your Full Bust

Your Full Bust is the fullest part of your bust (see image). Ensure that the measuring tape is completely straight and parallel to the floor. Wrap the soft measuring tape around firmly without pitching your skin together – write this measurement down

Measurement 2: Your Lower or Under Bust

The Lower or Under bust is measured by wrapping the measuring tape around your rib cage directly under your bust (see image). Wrap the soft measuring tape around firmly without pitching your skin together – write this measurement down

 

ELC Size 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22
Full Bust Measurements (cm) 81-87 87-93 93-99 99-105 106-114 115-123 124-130 131-137
Lower or Under Bust Measurement (cm) 61-67 67-73 73-79 80-86 87-39 94-100 100-106 107-113
Waist Measurement (cm) 75 80 85 90 95 100 110 115
Lower Waist Measurement (cm) 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125
Hip Measurement (cm) 95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130
USA 4 to 6 6 to 8 8 to 10 10 to 12 12 to 14 14 to 16 16 to 18 18 to 20
UK 6 to 8 8 to 10 10 to 12 12 to 14 14 to 16 16 to 18 18 to 20 20 to 22
EUROPE 34 to 36 36 to 38 38 to 40 40 to 42 42 to 44 44 to 46 46 to 48 48 to 50

 

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